Small Thank You

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unknownIn the midst of a normal day – in the crazy that becomes one class morphing into another – in the shuffle of papers in and the papers out – in the midst of the excuse notes to come – to go – and to do either and both earlier and later it happened. I saw that he had been standing in the back of rhe room unusually patient, waiting and quiet that he caught my eye. Read more

One Thing Read and Another On Its Feet

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imagesIn Directing Class everyone was asked to write a “Confession.” It was to be fit the following format:
1. One page in length
2. Involve only 2 characters
3. Have NO stage directions
4. Give the vast majority of the words to one character and have the second character speak only at the end – only for a sentence or two – and bring the entire scene to a conclusion. Read more

What Do You Bring?

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unknownMonologues are a b****. They are no fun to do. No questionable “fun” to coach – – simply no fun. They are, however, a necessary evil of this business. How in the world would you be able to get through hundreds of auditionees in anything less then a week if you didn’t cut down the actor’s presentation to just a moment or two. I have been coaching many, many of these monologues and find myself always questioning my skills after a coaching session. I worry that I have become so lecture-like that I have taught a good lesson, but done nothing to help the student tangibly improve the monologue. On the opposite hand, worry that I have done so much game playing that the actor had “fun” with the coaching section, but gained little to make the monologue improve trhe next time.
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Aren’t They Just Talking’?

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unknownToday in Plays and Playwrights we read a short one act with two young children sharing an afternoon of hooky from school. There is no one in the play other then these two children. On the surface not much happens: they meet each other, challenge and play with each other, and then the girl simply walks away down the railroad track – much as she began the story. Read more